Tennessee introduces Justice for All

I watched this stunning video produced by the Tennessee Supreme Court and not only was I impressed with its quality and its simplicity, but also with its universality.

Unfortunately, the statistics used within the video match the statistics here in South Carolina.

But the message is strong. And it’s needed.

Watch for yourself!

-RFW

Give it up for the Big TENNESSEE!

I am very pleased that Tennessee has joined the ranks of states with Access to Justice Commissions. On Friday, the Tennessee Supreme Court announced the creation of a new statewide Access to Justice Commission to help address the growing civil legal needs crisis in Tennessee.

To view the Order, click here.

For a biography of the Commission members, click here.

To view the 14 minute video, click here. To view the transcript of Chief Justice Janice M. Holder‘s announcement, click here.

The Commission Chair Margaret L. Behm’s remarks are here.

Congratulations and welcome to my old home state!

-RFW

Tennessee latest to add Access to Justice

On Friday, December 5th, the Tennessee Supreme Court announced an Access to Justice Initiative. Chief Justice Janice Holder offered a few remarks as to outline measures of the initiative as well as some general information as to the necessity of the initiative.

Only one in five income-eligible people will receive the legal help they need.

In our current troubled economy, the need for civil legal services among Tennessee’s indigent and working poor families can only be expected to increase as they face more legal problems caused by unemployment, predatory loans, uninsured medical bills, domestic violence, evictions, and foreclosures.

We send our best wishes to Tennessee with this initiative and offer our support. Congratulations and welcome aboard!

-RFW

Tennessee Bar Association wants more Pro Bono

THE CITY PAPER REPORTS:

The Tennessee Bar Association has asked the Tennessee Supreme Court to implement four changes in the rules under which lawyers here operate. The intent is to increase “pro bono” service.

1.         Review and possibly modify ethics rules regarding conflicts of interest for when attorneys participate in free legal-aid programs that offer limited services, such as legal advice hotlines, especially when the interaction involves “brief advice and no ongoing representation.”  

2.         Allow companies’ in-house attorneys can take part in legal aid and bar association pro bono programs, regardless of whether they have passed the Tennessee bar.  

3.         Adopt an “aspirational standard” of 50 hours per year of pro bono service.  

4.         Ask attorneys to report pro bono service hours to assist the legal industry as a whole to have reliable figures on how much pro bono work members of Tennessee’s bar do each year.

-RFW

For information about the South Carolina Bar’s Pro Bono Program, visit http://www.scbar.org/member_resources/pro_bono_program/.