Twitter and A2J: A Surprisingly Happy Partnership

Just happened to get on Twitter this a.m. for an early morning review of happenings in the Access to Justice (A2J) world, when I noticed a tweet from my colleague in Georgia, Mike Monahan, whose Twitter handle is @ProBono_GA. He retweeted a fellow named Damon Elmore (@bikeGAcounties) who is cycling every county in Georgia to raise money for Georgia Legal Services.

** Fun Fact: There are 159 counties in Georgia. For a full listing, visit http://georgia.gov/municipality-list **

I was blown away by this clever idea. Not only is it a great way to stay in shape with fun exercise, it is a great way to highlight the need for legal services throughout the state.

So, what did I do next? I tweeted, of course:

Just saw is biking every county in Georgia to raise money for – Great idea! Check it out and support him

And, after? I donated to the cause. As of this morning, he has raised $3140. His goal is to raise $15900 or $100 per county with all donations going directly to Georgia Legal Services.

~ rfw

P.S. – As a bonus, he did mention he was born in Beaufort, South Carolina. Maybe when he’s completed his goal in Georgia, we could convince him to visit our 46 counties.

Guest Blogger: Daniel Kim

Recently, I have been given the opportunity to work at the SC Access to Justice Commission (SCATJ) by being appointed as a “BFF,” a bar foundation fellow. The program is known as the South Carolina Bar Foundation Public Interest Fellows Project, which was started to increase student awareness of public interest law. It also offers public legal service organizations the help they need to accomplish the work they do for the public. Now you may wonder what SCATJ is and what the organization does; I know I did. But one of the great things about this program is that it gives students a chance to learn about public interest organizations that they did not know existed.

SCATJ is faced with the difficult challenge of “ensuring access to justice for all South Carolinians.” This organization was created to help people with low income and modest means obtain access to the South Carolina court system. One of their programs is geared towards self-represented litigants, and that is the field I have done the most amount of work. One of my major projects since starting here has been to work on an information guide for different counties within the judicial district of the new Newberry County Self-Help Center. Often times, self-represented litigants forego hiring an attorney due to lack of financial means. However, these litigants often go into court with no resources or knowledge of the SC legal and court system. They do not understand the legalese in forms, the process to properly fill out court documents and forms, and court policies and procedures, such as service of process.

SCATJ tries to provide self-represented litigants with guidelines and resources so that they may enter the court with more knowledge of the system. Chief Justice Toal has spearheaded the movement to streamline polices and procedures and have records be automated through the use of the Internet. This has enabled all courts in different SC counties to have similar paperwork.

The reason I came to law school was to help those in need and make an impact in the community. As cliché as that may sound, my passion and desire to achieve this goal is the reason I applied to be a “BFF” and the reason I want to become an attorney. The goals of SCATJ align with the goals I seek to accomplish after law school, and this is the sole reason I wanted to take part in this opportunity. This has been an invaluable learning experience for me thus far. I have learned a lot about public interest law, SC law, and the challenges everyday South Carolinians face to acquire what we, as law students, sometimes take for granted: obtaining justice. It has been a pleasure to work here at the SCATJ, and I look forward to continuing to work here in order to give back more to the community while continuing to learn and grow from this experience.

-Daniel Kim

It’s official – Poster and FAQs online – en español

Good News!  ¡Buenas noticias!

The South Carolina Courts’ Self-Help Page now offers FAQs (General Questions, Circuit Court and Family Court) and an explanation about what court staff can and cannot in Spanish!

And many thanks to student volunteers with the USC School of Law’s Pro Bono Program and the kind folks at HABLA!

-RFW

Happy Thanksgiving!

The South Carolina Access to Justice Commission will be closed for the Thanksgiving Holiday from Wednesday, November 25th through Friday, November 27th. We will re-open on Monday, November 30th.

Have a safe and pleasant Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving!

SCATJ Trains Magistrates

Yesterday the South Carolina Access to Justice Commission was pleased to be part of the Orientation for South Carolina Magistrates held at the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy.

Here is the presentation: Courtroom JUSTICE FOR ALL including SRLs July 2009

Here are some photos from the training:

A question about SRLs
A question about SRLs
Stephanie Nye presents
Stephanie Nye presents
Stephanie responding to a question
Stephanie responding to a question
Magistrates in the classroom
Magistrates in the classroom
Robin speaking
Robin speaking
-RFW

Photos from 6.17.09 Commission Meeting

Yesterday the South Carolina Access to Justice Commission held its meeting from 10:30 a.m. until a few minutes after 2:00 p.m. We were fortunate to start the morning with presentations from two Commissioners who work with Philanthropic Organizations – Tom Keith of Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina and Mac Bennett of United Way of the Midlands.
Commissioner Tom Keith Presents
Commissioner Tom Keith Presents
Commissioner Mac Bennett presents
Commissioner Mac Bennett presents

Several guests were in attendance as we discussed issues related to Staffed Programs such as South Carolina Legal Services and initiatives relating to Self-Represented Litigants.

Commissioners and guests at the 6.17.09 meeting
Commissioners and guests at the 6.17.09 meeting
The Hon. Michelle Childs, Chief Admin Judge of the SC 5th Circuit, and Tanya Gee of the SC Court of Appeals discuss SRLs
The Hon. Michelle Childs, Chief Admin Judge of the SC 5th Circuit, and Tanya Gee of the SC Court of Appeals discuss SRLs
The Commission then discussed progress on Rule 608 with members of the work group in attendance.
Louise Cooper of the SC GAL program and Hugh Ryan of SC Commission on Indigent Defense
Louise Cooper of the SC GAL program and Hugh Ryan of SC Commission on Indigent Defense
Commissioners and Guests
Commissioners and Guests
Allie Bullard, our Pro Bono law clerk, working hard at the meeting
Allie Bullard, our Pro Bono law clerk, working hard at the meeting

 Special thanks to Cindy Sullivan, Willson Powell, and Jada Bannen of Nelson Mullins for their assistance!

Photographs by Stephanie A. Nye.

-RFW

Allow me to introduce myself.

Hi All!

As per Robin’s introduction, my name is Alex Hegji, and I am a current 2L at USC School of Law. This past summer, I had the privilege of clerking for SCATJ, and I couldn’t have asked for a better experience!

I have always had an interest in public interest work, and SCATJ was an invaluable learning experience for me. I had never realized just how many barriers  South Carolinians of low-income or of modest means face when trying to obtain justice for themselves.  The barriers reach far beyond the inability to finance legal representation.  They include the ethical dilemmas faced by clerks of court when they assist self-represented litigants, the difficulties in acquiring sign-language interpreters in the courtroom for the Deaf, and everything in between. 

Some of my favorite projects that I worked on this past summer included helping to author court-approved forms for self-represented litigants and attending public hearings, which provided first-hand insight into the problems manySouth Carolinians must address when entering the S.C. justice system.

I hope this blog will be helpful and provide all of you with a law student’s perspective on SCATJ’s work.

Alex

SC Appleseed NOW!

Over Fifty, Overdrawn

This evening SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center will hit the small screen via NOW on PBS!

Sue Berkowitz, the Executive Director of Appleseed and an SCATJ Commissioner, was interviewed and will be featured on this program discussing the impact of the economic climate on today’s Baby Boomers.

According to the Post and Courier, other South Carolinians featured in the 30 minute show include Teresa Arnold, legislative director of the state’s AARP office and State Rep. Alan Clemmons, R-Myrtle Beach.

NOW airs tonight (1/23/09) at 8:30 p.m. on SCETV. And for those of us unable to view the program tonight, streaming video will be available online after the broadcast.

-RFW

Oh Canada! Oh yeah.

When lawyers are only for the rich

1-11409

Self-represented litigants are on the rise, not only here in South Carolina or the United States, but also in Canada according to Macleans special report. Interestingly, law and legal practice in both Canada and the USA are based on English law. So it may not be so far-fetched to share common practices – including a rise in the number of self-represented litigants (SRLs or those previously known as pro se).

The premise of the Macleans article (part 1 of a 5-part series) is that as the economy has faltered, the cost of attorneys has remained and many people are now unable to afford to pay for legal representation. They turn to self-representation. And, what they’re seeing in Toronto is similar to South Carolina.

 As the cost of hiring a lawyer soars out of reach, unrepresented litigants are flooding the courts in unprecedented numbers. While no definitive figures exist, some judges, especially in family law, say it’s over 60 per cent in their courtrooms. Chances are, those numbers are going to rise, as the legal profession is now paving the way for even more people to appear without a lawyer. Self-help centres have sprung up in several provinces, and lawyers are offering limited services to entice clients who otherwise couldn’t afford them. Critics say it’s a cynical way to deal with the problem. Being your own lawyer is “like doing your own dental work or heart surgery,” says Judith McCormack, executive director of Downtown Legal Services, a law clinic for the poor, run by the University of Toronto’s law faculty. “It’s a desperate response.”

Historically in South Carolina we’ve not tracked numbers of SRLs, but we are in the process of doing so. The South Carolina Access to Justice (SCATJ) Commission has been working with Court Administration, County Clerks of Court and Judges at all levels to develop protocols for maintaining court efficiency while continuing to meet the needs of the public. Additionally we have been working with these entities to produce court-approved forms that are free to South Carolinians and that are more easily understood than traditional court forms.

The SCATJ Commission will continue to work on improvements for self-represented litigants as well as working with legal service entities and private attorneys to make equal access to justice a reality to all South Carolinians.

-RFW