Focus on Pro Bono: Kate Loveland

Kate Loveland

Kate is currently a 2L, taking business corporations, products liability, constitutional law II, evidence, and professional responsibility. Currently her favorite class is products liability.  At USC School of Law, Kate is active with the Pro Bono program, the Moot Court Bar, and Phi Delta Phi.

Current Pro Bono Service:

Juvenile arbitrator for the 11th Circuit.

What does that entail?

“Every few weeks I receive a case from the solicitor’s office and spend time preparing for it before I meet with the juvenile, their parents, and the victim (if there is one). Then I work with all of the involved parties to come up with age-appropriate sanctions for the juvenile to complete. If the juvenile completes all of the sanctions within 90 days, the juvenile finishes the program and their case is closed. The program is designed to keep first time offenders out of the family court system, and give them another chance to restore the harm they’ve done through committing their crime to the community. The great thing about the program is that many of the sanctions given to the juvenile are designed to facilitate their involvement in the community and get them involved in projects that they might actually be interested in.”

How did you become involved in this specific project?

“I became a certified arbitrator during my senior year at the College of Charleston, when one of my professors suggested it as an internship program. It was a program I felt passionate about, and I wanted to continue in the arbitration program when I came to law school. I was transferred from the 9th circuit up to the 11th circuit, when I came to Columbia for law school.”

What have you learned from participating in this pro bono program?

“I think what surprises me most about the program that I am involved in is how much I actually get out of it every time I arbitrate a case. Not only do I learn more about an area of law, but I also always come away with the feeling that I’ve helped someone by just donating an hour of my time to the arbitration hearing.”

Do you see yourself staying involved in this or other pro bono programs?

“I’ve really enjoyed my experience as a juvenile arbitrator, which is why I want to continue to take arbitration cases and stay involved in the program, even when I am in private practice. It is probably a program I will always stay involved in, just because I really believe in what it does in giving first time offenders another chance to change their behavior.”

Advice to other law students:

“I would suggest that everyone in law school at some point participate in at least one pro bono activity. I think it’s important for students to understand that their role as a lawyer can be so much more, in that they can really give back to the community with the knowledge that they have learned about their profession.”

-RFW

Focus on Pro Bono: Elliott Tait

Elliott Tait is currently a 2L, taking Wills, Trusts and Estates, Constitutional Law II, Problems in Professional Responsibility, Transnational Law, and Poverty Law at the University of South Carolina School of Law. He is also a member of the Pro Bono Board and the Moot Court Bar.

When asked about his favorite class, Eliott replied “I really enjoy Poverty Law, taught by Professor Patterson.  It’s a class that analyzes the major policies relating to the poor, and it has certainly opened my eyes to the good things that government has been able to facilitate as well as the many things they could improve upon.”

While at the law school, he has checked in from time to time with Pamela DeFanti Robinson, the school’s Pro Bono Program Director. Through this program, he has been able to volunteer in a number of ways, with a memorable volunteer experience teaching a few CHOICES classes at the Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ).  The curriculum is meant to give the kids in DJJ practical and accessible knowledge of the law.  In particular, Elliott references the day he taught a lesson on law enforcement.  At the beginning of the class the kids were very cynical and even hostile toward anything surrounding the idea of police officers.  By the end of the class, however, a few of the kids were able to really put themselves in the shoes of police officers and begin to understand the reasons behind their conduct.  The simple acknowledgment that “maybe cops aren’t as bad as I think” was a huge victory.

Currently, he is providing Pro Bono assistance by working with the South Carolina Access to Justice Commission’s Self-Represented Litigant Committee under the supervision of Stephanie Nye, Counsel to the Chief Justice. This Committee is working to implement the state’s first self-help centers, which will provide resources to self-represented litigants.  Specifically Elliott is helping to draft and edit self-help centers’ guidelines. Additionally he is also drafting a resource list which contains relevant contact information and links to resources that for self-represented litigants.

When asked whether this particular Pro Bono experience has given him any surprises, he noted “I have been surprised at the level of opposition to self-help centers in some counties.  I understand some feelings of caution about the idea, but outright opposition is surprising.”

He continued “I have learned about the real value in providing services to self-represented litigants.  It’s a shame that South Carolina is many years behind other states in providing such services.”

Elliott also noted that his pro bono experience working with the SC Access to Justice Commission “has simply reaffirmed that the practice of law is a great way to serve others, as there is great need.”

As to his future?

“At this stage I see myself going into some form of public service.”

And what would he tell other law students about his experience?

“Pro Bono work has always been interesting, unique, challenging, and rewarding.  It has really enriched my law school experience, and I plan to make it a significant part of my professional career.”

-RFW