Cast your vote re: ghostwriting

I’ve received the following email 3 times. It’s time for me to share!

Following an article published yesterday, titled Kansas Ethics Opinion Requires Disclosure on Ghostwritten Pleadings, the ABA Journal has created a poll on ghostwriting.  Visit the site at www.abajournal.com to cast your vote in the poll “Is Ghostwriting Legal Documents Ethical?”.

Scroll down the screen to see the poll, which is located on the right side of the home page.  We’re not sure how long the poll will be open, so be sure to vote today.

This issue is particularly relevant for those of us interested in limited scope representation.

Limited scope representation varies state by state, but generally, it allows attorneys to provide a discrete service and is considered by many to increase access to justice – due to reduced costs for legal services.

A litigant or client may pay for someone to write a letter on their behalf or write their court documents, but complete their legal representation at that point.

Ghostwriting is when the attorney writes the documents for the client. In some states, the attorney does not have to sign their name; in others, it is mandatory.

What do you think? Case your vote at www.abajournal.com.

-RFW

Craigslist and Legal Services?

craigslist2

 

This is a referral post to both technola and the ABA Journal. Technola for its post about Craigslist and referral to the ABA Journal’s post requesting comments from readers about whether they’ve used Craigslist to advertise.

I’ll be following the findings.

-RFW

Afterthought: Is anyone monitoring attorney advertising rules and ethics on Craigslist?

ABA Journal makes the case for PLAIN LANGUAGE

I know you’ve heard it here before, but I just read an article about Plain Language that I couldn’t wait to share. It’s an article by Jim McElhaney in the November 2008 issue of the ABA Journal and can be accessed by clicking here. Teaser below:

Today, most U.S. lawyers share the disability of having gone to law school. . . .

The unspoken but central message of law school is if you want to be a lawyer, learn to write like the judges who wrote the opinions in your casebooks. And even worse, learn to talk like a law professor.

Enjoy!

-RFW

 PS – Another blogger thought this article was noteworthy – http://blogs.geniocity.com/friedman/?tag=jim-mcelhaney