Happy New Year! Welcome 2014

It’s been a really good year for South Carolina Access to Justice! Below is our newsletter that highlights a few items we’ve been working on.

SCATJ Newsletter End of Year 2013

Happy New Year Everyone!

~rfw

Law School for Interpreters: A Success!

Bright and early Saturday morning, 77 people were driving into downtown Columbia to attend the SC Access to Justice Commission’s LEP Work Group “Law School for Interpreters.”

Meanwhile, the sponsors were all busy opening the facility and readying the room and registration tables for each of these interpreters.

At 8:45 a.m., seats filled and the LEP Work Group provided an overview of the day and the program began.

The Agenda:

  • Registration and Breakfast 8:00 a.m.
  • Welcome & Overview 8:45 a.m.
  • Pretest 9:00 a.m.
  • “Oh the Places You Can Go and the People You Can Meet” (Overview of the SC Judicial System) 9:15 a.m.
  • South Carolina State Court Interpreter Certification Program 9:45 a.m.
  • BREAK
  • Circuit Court 10:30 a.m.
  • Family Court 11:15 a.m.
  • Magistrates Court 12:00 noon
  • Catered Lunch
  • Court Process 1:45 p.m.
  • BREAK
  • Panel Discussion & Q&A: Reality Check 3:15 p.m.
  • Post-test, Wrap-Up, & Evaluation 4:45 p.m.

The excitement in the room was palpable. Interpreters greeted one another with hugs, and sometimes questions of “which language do you speak?” And the excitement was not limited to interpreters and translators. Many of the event sponsors were thrilled with the turn-out, especially on a Saturday. Languages represented included Spanish, French, Portuguese, Italian, Chinese, French, and Urdu as well as a few others.

And we’re all excited about the prospect of an additional pool of qualified and certified interpreters and translators in the South Carolina Court System.

Thanks again to our sponsors, speakers, and participants!

~RFW

Want to Interpret in the South Carolina Courts?

Join us on Saturday, February 11, 2012!

Cost: $35 – includes breakfast, lunch, snacks and materials! Pay by check or Discover, Visa or MasterCard.

Program begins promptly at 8:45 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m.

Space is limited and preference is given to South Carolina residents.

Registration MUST be post-marked no later than Friday, February 3, 2012. No refunds for cancellations received after Friday, January 27, 2012.

For more information, please email ccoker@scbar.org or call Robin Wheeler at (803) 576-3808.

At our recent SC Access to Justice Commission meeting, we had a guest speaker who presented on Language Access and the growing need for language access in the civil court system.

And, while many of us understand the laws that govern language access, especially in the legal system, the fact still remains that in order to provide qualified interpreters, these qualified interpreters must be available and accessible.

Most everyone I’ve spoken with has noted that we need more qualified interpreters. We simply do not have the numbers of qualified interpreters.

During our preliminary conversations, we learned that while there is a general interest to interpret, many in the interpretation community were unfamiliar with legal terminology and courtroom decorum. And, interpreters were hesitant to pay to take the South Carolina Court Interpreter exam without at least an introduction to the legal system in South Carolina.

As a result, Law School for Interpreters was created.

I’m pleased to introduce the Law School for Interpreters which will be held on Saturday, February 11, 2012. We have a great line-up of speakers including attorneys and at least one judge. The sponsors for the event have all been working together with the Commission as we try to increase the number of qualified courtroom and legal interpreters.

If you, or someone you know, is interested in this course, please complete and return the registration form - Registration for Law School for Interpreters Feb 11 2012.

I look forward to seeing you there!

~RFW

Disabilities Awareness Public Forum, Wed., Oct. 26, 2011

Tomorrow as part of Celebrate Pro Bono 2011, several attorneys will be speaking at a Disabilities Awareness Public Forum in Greenville, South Carolina.

The event is FREE and open to the public. We do have ASL Interpreters available for the event, but if you need additional accomodations, please contact Stephanie Gutzman at 864-235-0273 or by email at gutzman@pandasc.org.

Hope to see you there!

~RFW

Celebrate Pro Bono: Bryan Lysell

As part of Celebrate Pro Bono 2011, we are highlighting pro bono legal service in South Carolina.

Meet BRYAN LYSELL, 3L at the University of South Carolina School of Law.

Bryan Lysell

Bryan Lysell has been involved in the USC School of Law Pro Bono Program since his first semester in law school. He currently serves as co-Presidents of the Pro Bono Board and participates in the Carolina Clerks project with the South Carolina Appleseed Legal Justice Center and he volunteers at the Homeless Law Clinic (HELP) in St. Peter’s Church.

I asked Bryan a few questions about pro bono, including what first drew him to the program. Here’s what he said:

That is hard to say.  I guess what first drew me to the Pro Bono Program was public radio.  I like NPR and the pro bono program volunteers each year to man the telephones at ETV’s fall fundraiser.  I volunteered for that and sat next to Pam Robinson.  Pam asked me what I did before I came to law school and when I told her that I used to work for a labor union, she was one of the first people I met in South Carolina who had a positive reaction.  I think I thought to myself then that a program that that lady runs must be a good program.  That impression has been borne out time and again over the last three years.

When asked about he became involved with the various projects, he noted:

I learned about all of these programs through Pam Robinson.  With regard to the Carolina Clerks position, I responded to a general request that Pam had sent out via email.

In September, Pam needed someone to fill an open spot at HELP one morning and she asked me if I could stop by.  I think Pam asked me because HELP is a morning gig and she knew that I am generally an early riser.

He also participates with Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA),

VITA was one of the first things that I got involved in at law school and I feel like it really set the tone for my continued participation in the pro bono program.  I used to be a labor union representative and I enjoy talking to people.  VITA gave me an opportunity to interact with folks who have problems and who are trying to get help with them.  It had a lot of the characteristics of my former employment and it was comforting to me to be able to do something that felt familiar and that I thought I was good at (particularly in my 1L year when that feeling is an otherwise rare commodity.

One of his favorite pro bono memories is participating in VITA:

I had a nice surprise while doing taxes.  An elderly man came in needing to have his taxes prepared. 

Usually I like to chat with folks while I do their taxes.  I find it entertaining and having a conversation with the person to whom you’ve entrusted an important task usually makes people feel more comfortable in that entrustment. 

This guy just would not bite, though; he responded monosyllabically, if at all to any questions I would ask, even those related to taxes. 

As I went through his documents, I found a 1099 for a pension that he received from LTV.  LTV is a steel company that specializes in producing steel pipe. I asked him whether he worked in a mill and he told me that he worked at a mill in Cleveland. 

Well, I’m from Pittsburgh, and my father, my uncle, and my grandfather all worked in the mills, and in particular my grandfather worked in the McKeesportworks, which specialized in continuous cast steel pipe.  When I told him all of that, his demeanor turned 180 degrees and he was as affable as anyone I had ever met.  We talked about the Steelers and the Browns, about steel mills, about South Carolina summers and how unbearably long and hot they are, and about Midwest winters and how unbearably long and cold they are. 

I don’t think I’ll ever forget that guy.  I hope he comes around again this year.

You need to listen to people when they are talking to you about their concerns, that sometimes they’re saying more than what they’re actually saying.

As he related what he’s learned from doing pro bono work, it was evident that he will make a fine attorney:

I have relearned that you need to listen to people when they are talking to you about their concerns, that sometimes they’re saying more than what they’re actually saying.  I think that has particularly been the case at the homeless legal clinic.  Sometimes you are talking to people who have been involved in significant domestic violence issues and while some people can talk openly about it, others cannot. 

When asked about whether participating in pro bono changed his view of law, he noted:

What changed my view of the law was learning that lawyers have an ethical obligation to helping people in need gain access to the justice system.  I feel like that ethical obligation corresponds with my own notions of what a personally productive career would be and what is an appropriately civic minded individual.

In his co-President role, he actively speaks about pro bono and encourages other students to participate. Specifically:

When I talk to other law students about the Pro Bono Program I usually like to stress to them that this is an opportunity to interact with actual people, the kind that you are going to interact with as a real attorney, and that law students should take those opportunities whenever they can get them. 

This kind of interaction is an education in its own right, and the ability to communicate complicated ideas to people in a manner that is easily understandable is an essential component to being a good advisor, which itself is essential to being a good lawyer. 

I usually conclude by saying that, if nothing else, it feels good to be able to help people that need it and that as lawyers we have an ethical obligation to do exactly this kind of work.

I’m looking forward to hearing more from this valuable pro bono leader!

~RFW

New Report from Appleseed: Focus on Kids

Good News:

SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center released its FOCUS ON KIDS report.

Bad News:

The information contained in the report.

Did you know that South Carolina ranks forty-fifth among states for overall child well-being?

Click on the link to read the report, Focus on Kids full budget.

-RFW

Appleseed’s Advocate of the Year – Now Online

In case you missed the SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center Advocate of the Year Award Celebration honoring this year’s recipient, Vickie L. Eslinger, Esq., fret not – information is available online.

SC Appleseed Legal Justice CenterAdvocates of the Year

Kenneth M. Suggs. Esq. – 2006
George B. Cauthen, Esq. – 2007
I.S. Leevy, Jr., Esq. – 2008
Victoria L. Eslinger, Esq – 2009

-RFW

Congratulations Vickie Eslinger!

In case you haven’t already heard, SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center has named Columbia attorney Victoria L. Eslinger as their 2009 Advocate of the Year!

Advocate of the Year award is awarded each year to an advocate within the South Carolina legal community who provides a strong voice for low-income children and families.

Congratulations Ms. Eslinger!

For details on the Award Event, visit http://www.scjustice.org/advocateoftheyear.html.

-RFW

Friday Resource: SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center

Friday Resource - SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center

Friday Resource - SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center

In South Carolina, when you think of poverty law and advocacy, you often think of  the SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center.

What you may not know is that SC Appleseed also publishes brochures, manuals and pamphlets for South Carolinians. Like the SCATJ Commission, SC Appleseed is a fan of PLAIN LANGUAGE and has some material available in Spanish (en español).

-RFW

Tune In TONIGHT and Tomorrow Morning

The Big Picture is once again featuring a topic of interest to South Carolinians in the civil justice community. This week’s topic is The Working Poor.

For the program, Mark Quinn, the host of The Big Picture, interviewed prestigious guests such as Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter, Sue Berkowitz of SC Appleseed Legal Justice Center and Dr. Adolphus Belk of Winthrop University.

TV Air Date: TONIGHT: Thursday – August 06, 2009 at 7:30 pm

Every Friday morning “The Big Picture on the Radio” airs on ETV Radio. Discussion focuses the television topic of the week amongst other timely subjects. Be sure to check ‘The Big Picture’ homepage each Friday afternoon to tune in live starting at 1:00 p.m.

TV repeats of Thursdays broadcast will air each Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and again on Sunday at 1:00 p.m.

-RFW